The Jerusalem Gateway is a project for improving and developing the area that is the main entrance to Jerusalem from Tel Aviv and the coast. It is the area where Highway 1 enters the city. The project will connect the Jerusalem Central Bus Station, the terminal of the Tel Aviv to Jerusalem railroad, the Jerusalem Light Rail, and the Jerusalem Chords Bridge improving the main entrance to Jerusalem from the west.

The business quarter in 80 ha is projected to create 24 offices towers which will offer extensive employment, commercial, and culture leisure, as well an estimate of 2,000 hotel rooms and a vibrant, active, and welcoming public area. In addition, the project will establish Israel’s largest integrated transportation hub  including a high-speed train, two light rail lines, public transit lanes, and bike lanes.

On the northern part of the site in the 1920s and 1930s, Car complexes were built as a part of the development of the commercial axis of Jaffa Street. The first floor was used for trade, and the upper floor was residential. In the 1950s, the complex was transferred to the state and was used by the Government Automobile Administration and received its name. In the 1990s the complex was abandoned.

The buildings suffered from partial breakdowns, fires, water penetration, vandalism and lack of maintenance. Entrance to the buildings is currently prohibited as some structures are dangerous.

After discussing the environmental and historical value of buildings, the court rejected the appeal of conservationists.

Recommendations were taken on the demolition of certain car complexes to create a large open space between the central station and the new Jerusalem railway station. This provides an opportunity for the inexperienced visitor to improve the visibility of the area and create a wide roundabout, as well as, reduce the security risk that may arise as a result of a lot of pedestrian traffic.

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JERUSALEM GATEWAY

Plottage: 2 189 056 ft2  (203 370 m2)

Total building area: 261 659 ft2  (24 308 m2)

Daily Passers: 100,000

Offices Towers: 24

Employment, commercial, and culture area: 8 800 000 ft2  (817 465 m2)

Expected Workplaces: 60,000

Number of Light Trains Rails: 2

Number of Interurban Bus Stations: 487

 

NORTHERN COMPOSITION COMPOUND

Plottage: 37 674 ft2  (3 500 m2)

Current Total building area: 45 477 ft2  (4 225 m2)

Current floors: 2-3 

Total building area: 91 493 ft2  (8 500 m2)

Floors: 6-8

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Design principles

The architecture has to be consistent, clean volumes made by stone to respect the grain of the city and the design properties, and qualities of the material.

The volumes are composed of three elements: transparent ground level, plinth, and towers. Simplicity and regularity are also reflected in the facades. To address the hot climate summer and the winter conditions of Jerusalem, the architecture is responsive and adaptable. To address climate concerns in the public space, the key design strategy is to create a shaded space on ground level, arcades cover the sidewalks to protect pedestrians during hot days and generating a continuous walkway useful for cold winter days. In this way, the sidewalk becomes an in-between space within the street and the building, creating a more open, inviting ground level. It is also recommended that the majority of openings are focused on ground and lower levels of the building. The upper floors receive more sun, so a gradient of openings is recommended there to reduce sun and heat exposure.

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Design characteristics:

— With its simple, clear geometrical forms, the construction volumes give the quarter a concise overall appearance.

— Ground floors towards streets are surrounded by arcades. Arcades must be 2 floors height where the slope terrain allows this height. The recommended columns axis distance is approx. 6 meters. 

— Technical floors should be placed in the basement, leaving the plinth rooftop as free as possible for open terraces and solar system.

— No railing on the roof of the plinth.

— Technical floors should be placed in the basement, leaving the plinth rooftop as free as possible for open terraces and solar system.


Participation in the project:

  • Design, analysis.
  • Competition project presentation.
  • 3D visualization.